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Teachers can face serious back problems

| Dec 11, 2017 | Workers' Compensation

Teachers shape and mold the small people who are going to run our country and world. These men and women have very important jobs, but just because they work with children doesn’t mean that they are without a risk of injury.

Teaching is a very difficult job that requires the these professionals to be mentally prepared. You can’t leave out the physical preparation that is necessary to deal with the bending, stooping and other movement that comes with teaching.

Pain isn’t normal

Many teachers can suffer from back injuries that can end up to be career ending injuries. The thing that teachers need to remember is that a backache that is only temporary is a call to action. This is usually a sign that you need to stretch more and get your back a bit stronger.

When the backache turns into pain and it is persistent, you need to seek out medical care. This is a sign that there is serious damage being done to your back. These cumulative injuries are best managed and are more easily treated when they are caught early.

Tips to help prevent back injuries

Because teachers often bend over a student’s desk, sit down to grade papers and stand to give lectures throughout the day, there is considerable stress on the back. This is particularly true for the lower back, which takes the brunt of the pressure. One way that teachers can reduce the impact of these activities on the back is by using correct posture throughout the day.

In the classroom, especially in early elementary education, teachers are often faced with having to spend countless hours on furniture meant for children. This adds to the issue that they already face regarding back health. Instead of sitting on this furniture, teachers might choose to invest in cushions or seating options that enable them to get down on the same level as the students without harm to the back.

When injuries do occur

Teachers who suffer a back injury in the classroom, including a cumulative injury, might end up needing to take time off of work to allow the back to heal. Surgery might be necessary in severe cases, which could mean that the teacher can’t return to work. Ultimately, injured teachers should explore their options for workers’ compensation coverage to help them get medical bills paid and to provide them with partial wage replacement and possibly disability payments.

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