PLEASE NOTE: Bonifield & Rosenstengel will remain open and available to serve you during the COVID-19 crisis. We are offering our clients the ability to meet with us via telephone or video conference. Please call our office to discuss your options.
Bonifield & Rosenstengel
Get your free consultation today! 618-215-2412 local  866-223-2525toll free
Get your free consultation today!

618-215-2412 local  

866-223-2525 toll free

What to know about workplace injuries

| Feb 8, 2021 | Workers' Compensation

Although Illinois employers are required to take reasonable steps to keep you safe while on the job, there is no guarantee that you won’t get hurt at work. Sprains, cuts and broken bones are among the most common types of injuries that you are likely to sustain while working in a manufacturing facility. Let’s take a closer look at why these injuries are so common and what you might be able to do to minimize your risk of a workplace accident.

Why workplace injuries occur

Sprains, strains and muscle tears are generally the result of repetitive motion during each shift. It isn’t uncommon to spend several hours each day on a factory floor bending, reaching or lifting heavy objects. You may also be at risk of getting hurt if you come into contact with electrical wires or machines that are still running. Toxic chemicals, falling objects and workplace violence can also lead to broken bones, concussions or other serious health problems.

What you can do to prevent workplace injuries from occurring

It is important to adhere to your employer’s workplace safety rules at all times. These rules may require you to wear goggles while in the presence of toxic chemicals or to refrain from lifting heavy objects on your own. Failing to adhere to existing protocols may complicate your efforts to receive workers’ compensation benefits after a workplace accident.

It’s also a good idea to remain cognizant of any hazards that you might encounter while performing your duties. For instance, if you notice that the floor is wet, you should take time to get rid of the liquid. At a minimum, you should put up a wet floor sign or take other steps to keep others from slipping or falling.

Archives

FindLaw Network