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866-223-2525 toll free

Who causes rear-end collisions?

| Mar 17, 2021 | Car Accidents

Vehicles may suffer all kinds of damage in a crash, and rear-end collisions rank among the most common accidents on the road in Illinois and around the country. While neck and back injuries may occur, other worse injuries could happen. Even when no one suffers any physical harm, property damage may result. Why do rear-end collisions typically happen, and how do you determine who is at fault?

Facts about rear-end collisions

Rear-end collisions cause about 29% of all serious auto accidents, and, unfortunately, the nature of such crashes makes defensive driving difficult. For example, a person stopped at a red light follows the law accordingly while waiting for the change to green. An intoxicated driver who crashes into the rear of the awaiting vehicle may do so without any warning.

Ultimately, driver negligence ranks as the top reason for rear-end collisions. Sometimes, such accidents turn out to be unavoidable, but those incidents occur at a lesser rate than negligence-derived accidents. Not paying attention to the road, speeding and following other vehicles too closely can easily lead to rear-end crashes.

One point about rear-end collisions

Assuming that only the car in the rear is at fault for a rear-end collision might not be accurate. Sometimes, the car in the front commits a moving violation or does something ill-advised, leading to a crash. Tailgating a driver and then slamming on the brakes to avoid a collision may lead to the tailgater causing a rear-end collision if the person behind them cannot stop in time.

Sometimes, a multi-car accident could cause a rear-ended vehicle to hit another car. The vehicle that started the chain reaction may be the negligent one. The car that rear-ends another might be a victim of negligence and physics.

What about a bicyclist who bolts into an intersection? The cyclist might force a car to stop, and that vehicle ends up rear-ended. The driver who hit the car might not be negligent, and both cars may have a case against the cyclist.

Car accidents resulting from negligence may lead to litigation. An attorney may assist injury victims seek compensation for any harm suffered.

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