Can social media hurt your personal injury case?

On Behalf of | Jun 10, 2021 | Personal injury

Most people choose to stay connected over social networking sites. Individuals can update friends, family and co-workers about daily life or significant events at a moment’s notice. With only a few button taps on your phone, you can share thoughts, photos and videos. Unfortunately, some status updates can work against you after a serious injury.

Using social networking outlets like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat is fun and popular for millions of people multiple times a day. It is not uncommon, however, for a post to be taken out of context, misconstrued or simply ill-advised. For example:

  • Physical status: People often have the habit of exaggerating on social media. In certain situations, though, displaying health, wealth or fitness could ultimately contradict the facts of your case. Some people will even post a picture taken days or weeks ago that does not reflect their current status. These photos can be used as evidence against you.
  • Incorrect timeline: Many people will post several times over the course of the day. Investigators might stitch together a timeline that may or may not be accurate. Posting about having a cocktail with friends prior to a motor vehicle accident, for example, could cast a negative light on your ability to make sound decisions while behind the wheel.
  • Negative history: Another type of photo that could be used against you is evidence of negative activities while behind the wheel. If you stage a photo that makes it look like you were snapping pictures while driving, it could be used to exhibit poor driving decisions.

It is wise to think twice before posting images or status updates that can be used against you. Insurance investigators take their roles seriously and it is their job to protect the bottom line of the insurance company. If it can be proven that you might not be the safest driver or elements of your injury are exaggerated, you could hurt your chances to recover the compensation you are entitled to.

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